Cyber security and Fraud

Over the last few weeks I have blogged about a few events at #CyberFest21 which stood out for me. All of the events during the festival were good yet some have stuck in my memory and are worth a revisit. 

The third one I wanted to mention and probably the last was Cyber security and Fraud, the fifth event in the series. All of them are available on Dynamo’s YouTube site.

There is such a huge relationship between fraud and cyber security. Indeed the vast majority of fraud or attempted fraud is carried out online. I suspect that all of us have had some email or text message request asking for our bank details. It is important therefore that the organizations working to counter fraud in the region work together.

On the back of this, the event had started out as a joint event with the North East Fraud Forum (NEFF), the North East Business Resilience Centre (NEBRC) and the North East Initiative on Business Ethics (NIBE). That’s a lot of North East’s. By the time it came round to the event however, the Business Resilience Centre and the Fraud Forum had merged.

Anyway the event offered a series of talks around ‘Cyber security and fraud, what is happening, what you can do about it and the ethics of your action or inaction.’

After the usual introductions, the event got underway with a presentation from Paddy O’Keefe Regional Economic Crime Coordination Centre – Regional Economic Crime Coordination Centre (RECCC) at The North East Regional Special Operations Unit (NERSOU) about ‘The relationship between cyber security and fraud.’

Next up was a presentation on ‘The lawyer’s role in managing the aftermath of cyber security incidents’ by Jonny Gribben – Managing Associate and Peter Wacrup – Tech and Data Disputes Lawyer at Womble Bond Dickinson. 

This was followed by a group discussion including Sharon McDonald and Dominc Button from Sunderland University on ‘What more can the police, business and the public do to help each other?’

The fourth presentation was by Elizabeth Gardiner from Protect, the organisation that aims to make whistleblowing work for individuals, organisations and society, on ‘Does a whistleblowing policy help cyber security and fraud prevention?’

I have been intrigued for some time about businesses’ responsibility to cyber security and so the event ended with another discussion, this time led by Caroline Theobald from NIBE on ‘The ethics of action or inaction.’ Is it acceptable for business leaders to stick their heads in the sand over this issue?

The event is aimed at business people, business leaders, academia, cyber security students, cyber security professionals and anyone interested in a cyber career. The video can be found here.

Timestamp for the speakers:

  • The relationship between cyber security and fraud, Paddy O’Keefe Regional Economic Crime Coordination Centre – RECCC at NERSOU – 06:40 mins.
  • The lawyer’s role in managing the aftermath of cyber security incidents, Jonny Gribben – Managing Associate Womble Bond Dickinson and Peter Wacrup – Tech and Data Disputes Lawyer at Womble Bond Dickinson – 31:10 mins.
  • Panel Discussion – what more can the police, business and the public do to help each other, including audience Q&A, Sharon McDonald and Dominc Button, Sunderland University – 01:01:00 hour and mins.
  • Does a whistleblowing policy help cyber security and fraud prevention, Elizabeth Gardiner – Protect – 01:30:40 hour and mins.
  • Discussion – The ethics of action or inaction, including audience Q&A, Caroline Theobald – NIBE – 02:04:50 hours and mins.

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